Tag: ccTLDs

How does DNSSEC add an additional level of security?

DNSSEC is the most effective technique to secure your Domain Name System. We’ll explain why, what the phrase implies, and how you can benefit from it in this article. So, let’s keep it going.

The explanation of DNSSEC

DNSSEC is a collection of Security Extensions for the DNS that adds authentication and data integrity.

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) invented it in the 1990s. Its primary goal is to provide an authentication method that uses digital signatures and public cryptography to prove the data’s origin. The data owner can use its private key to sign DNS data (DNS records) and ensure that the information is secure. Each recursive server can validate the data’s origin by comparing it to the public key.

It’s a complete chain of trust, beginning with the root server and ending with the exact hostname. Except for the root zone, which has nothing on top of it, each zone is signed by the one above it.

If the recursive server cannot authenticate the data for some reason, it will discard it and try again. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Is it advantageous?

The importance of DNSSEC may be summed up in two statements:

  1. You can ensure that the DNS data (DNS records) has not been tampered with by using DNSSEC. Consider what would happen if a cybercriminal modified DNS records on the route to the customer. The client can obtain a modified version of the product. A record that points to a server under the lousy actor’s control. There is a risk that the client’s data will be stolen. As a result, DNS cache poisoning is less likely. 
  2. Authentication of DNS data from a source. You can be sure that the data comes from a legitimate source and that the authoritative name server is valid using DNSSEC. It will prevent any bogus server forecasts.

Where can you get DNSSEC?

DNSSEC is not set up automatically. It is, however, straightforward to set up. As a result, most DNS hosting companies include it as a standard feature.

A substantial number of domains do not support DNSSEC. However, their entire worth is negligible. It can be used by well-known generic top-level domains (gTLDs) and country-code top-level domains (ccTLDs).

Simply enable it in the control panel of your DNS hosting provider to get started. Then look for DNSSEC and click “enable” for each DNS zone you want. After that, you’ll get a DS (Delegation Signer) record, which you should point to your domain’s registration information.

Conclusion

The decision to adopt DNSSEC to maintain DNS security is a wise one. Nowadays, cyber threats and direct DNS attacks are commonplace. Of course, DNSSEC is expensive, but you already know that the cost of preventing a criminal attack is always less than the cost of repairing the unintended consequences of a criminal attack.