Tag: Domain name

What does Reverse DNS mean?

Reverse DNS is an absolutely beneficial instrument for every business. It will convert the IP address into the domain name. But what makes you think you’d want that? Let’s take a closer look at Reverse DNS to comprehend it better.

PTR record – definition

The PTR is a DNS record type that we use for Reverse DNS to connect IP addresses (both IPv4 and IPv6) to the domain name. For example, when receiving mail servers want to know where an email came from, they execute a rDNS lookup and seek for PTR records. The PTR records will ensure that the IP address is actually associated with the domain name.

The purpose of Reverse DNS

Reverse DNS, also known as rDNS, is a querying technique used by DNS (Domain Name System) to do a particular sort of query with an IP address (IPv4 or IPv6) as an input and a name record as an output (A record or AAAA record). It’s termed reverse because it works in the same way as a forward DNS lookup, which connects an IP address to a domain name.

If you wish to check a specific host, you can use rDNS. Each host connected to a network has an IP address as an identification. You can readily see the IP address, but you can also execute a reverse DNS lookup to view the domain name and decide whether or not to trust it.

When do we use a Reverse DNS?

Reverse DNS is really helpful. We can use it for a range of things:

  • rDNS is extremely beneficial to businesses. It ensures that all of their emails are effectively sent to their clients and that they are not labeled spam.
  • We use it to ensure that the IP address and domain name are identical in most cases. If they don’t match, a man-in-the-middle attack (phishing) with malicious intent is possible. When a discrepancy arises, it is a piece of sure evidence that a cybercriminal has altered the data, and there is a security risk.
  • Reverse DNS is commonly beneficial for owners of large IP networks to improve and organize them.
  • When looking through domain registration and registrar files, rDNS could be useful in locating the domain of a device that is attempting to crack a firewall, spammers, or hackers.

Can you check it?

Yes, you can. What only you need is a computer and IP address. But the verification depends on your Operating System. So let’s see the different possibilities, which are as follows:

  • On Windows

On the Windows operating system, you can use the Nslookup command. First, find the Command Prompt and open it. Then inside, type the following command:

nslookup 52.14.98.213

Note that this is an example of Internet Protocol. So you have to change it with the one which you want to make the verification.

  • On Linux and macOS

Here the procedure is similar. So first, you have to find the Terminal and open it. Inside, type the following command:

dig –x 52.14.98.213

The same applies here to changing the IP address.

Conclusion

Finally, we came to a conclusion. So you can safely assume that you understand what the Reverse DNS is for. It is really beneficial, and it’s worth giving it a chance!